Archive | Book Reviews

The Second Mrs. Price

The Second Mrs. Price: A Beautiful Read

“In the Midwest, in the spring, there are a few days so warm and soft, so gently in motion, so tenderly inviting, that we forget the ravages of the winter just behind us, the heavy breathless summer days just ahead; we accept that we are home, that we are where we belong.” Thus Toni Fuhrman […]

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The God of Small Things

The God of Small Things: a Story That Grows On You

Arundhati Roy, in his tale of “two-egg twins,” weaves a story that will stay with you and grow long after you’ve put it down. Roy brings the Indian valley around Ayemenem to life with a power and depth that reminds me of Steinbeck’s descriptions of the Salinas Valley. Its heat, smells, wildlife suck you with […]

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Democracy in America

Democracy in America

I’ve always been fascinated by America, the American experiment, the American experience. In college, I found my place in the sociology, anthropology, political science and literature of the American people, their values and ideals. My novels are born of the culture of merging, conflicting cultures we, as Americans, were born into and from my conviction […]

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Love in the Northwest: Mary Trimble’s Maureen

  After two successful memoirs, Mary Trimble returns to fiction in MAUREEN, a story of loss and recovery. For readers who love being carried deep to the setting of the story, this novel is a winner. Trimble’s deep love of the Northwest which shines through earlier books is a commanding presence in MAUREEN, shaping character […]

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One Who Loves

ONE WHO LOVES Now in Print!

I’m delighted to announce that Toni Fuhrman’s novel, One Who Loves, will be coming out in print on March 15th. Those of you who appreciate the tangled relationship of love, loss, and grief won’t want to miss this story.

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Ann Patchett, Commonwealth

Ann Patchett’s COMMONWEALTH: a Review

Ann Patchett, in Commonwealth has captured the lives of six children whose families have been splintered by the love affairs of their parents. She does so with humor and compassion and her always compelling grasp of storytelling and language.  Bert Cousins, father of three (soon to be four), shows up uninvited at the christening of […]

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the-poison-tree_

Masterful Suspense: The Poison Tree

  Erin Kelly opens THE POISON TREE with a phone call that dries the saliva in the protagonist’s mouth and sends her driving across a frozen London in her pajamas and boots. We do not know who she is except that she has done terrible things for her family and the phone call is driving […]

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The Headmasters Wife

The Headmaster’s Wife: A Read for the Soul

A naked old man found wandering through Central Park turns out to be the Headmaster of a Vermont elite prep school. How can this be? How can such a man come to this? It violates every belief we carry about the inhabitants of that world. The Headmaster’s Wife,  weaves a tale of obsession, grief and […]

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The Nightingale: A Powerful Read

“In love we find out who we want to be; in war we find out who we are.” With those words, Vianne Rossignol opens the story of her life, and the lives of her loved ones, during the occupation of France. Rossingnol means ‘nightingale” in French, and in the end Vianne recognizes herself in that […]

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Picoult A Second Glance

Jodi Picoult’s Second Glance: a Ghost Story

Whether you believe in ghosts or believe, as this author does, in the power of the imagination to bring to life the unacknowledged legacies of the past to haunt the present, Second Glance is, despite some weaknesses, a thought provoking read. In this story, the ghosts are real, and though I was willing to suspend my […]

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